The Passing of the Law of Moses and Sam Frost – #3- The Passing of Heaven and Earth

The Passing of The Law of Moses and Sam Frost’s Growing Desperation – #3
What About Those OT Prophecies of the Passing of “Heaven And Earth”?

Is the Bible about the passing of literal heaven and earth?
Does the Bible link the passing of the Law of Moses with the passing of literal heaven and earth?

As noted in our second installment responding to Sam Frost’s article on Matthew 5:17-18 is that among Frost’s many claims,he says that the Old Law foretold the passing of material creation, the literal heaven and earth. Let me remind the reader that I observed that he did not give one single text from the Tanakh to prove that assertion.

So, Frost says that the Law could not pass away until heaven and earth passes. He says that it would pass when it was all fulfilled– including the prophecies of the passing of heaven and earth. Yet, he did not offer a key stroke of proof for his claim that the Old Testament predicted the end of the space / time continuum. This is telling.

In numerous formal debates, I have challenged my opponents to provide at least three OT prophecies of the yet future Old Covenant prophecies of the “end of time” or the passing of material heaven and earth. The utter desperation of my opponents has been incredible! One debate opponent, Bill Lockwood, refused to even try to give and OT prophecy of the passing of heaven and earth. I pressed and pressed him until finally, in written response, he said “Enoch!” Hmmm, I did not realize that Enoch was an OT prophecy!

Side bar: One reason this issue is so important is because Peter says in 2 Peter 3:1-2 that his discussion of the Day of the Lord is simply a reiteration of what Jesus, the other apostles and the prophets who had spoken before, had to say about the Day. In his discussion of the Day of the Lord, he cites Isaiah 65-66. He also echoes other OT prophecies of the Day, including Daniel 9 and Malachi 4 among those that can be listed. My point is that if the OT prophecies that Peter cites do not predict the end of time, or the destruction of literal heaven and earth, then one cannot make 2 Peter 3 a prediction of the end of time!

Anyway, from time to time, futurists do offer a few OT prophecies of the passing of heaven and earth to maintain their view. Space considerations prevent an extensive examination of those texts, but, I will list four of the texts that have been offered– which is pretty much the sum total of those offered.

Let’s look now at the key OT prophecies that futurists claim predict the end of the physical cosmos.

Psalms 102:25-28:
“Of old You laid the foundation of the earth, And the heavens are the work of Your hands. They will perish, but You will endure; Yes, they will all grow old like a garment; Like a cloak You will change them, And they will be changed. But You are the same, And Your years will have no end.”

This passage is quoted in Hebrews 1:10 and we are assured by futurists that it must refer to the end of time. But, it is pretty clear that those who appeal to Psalms to establish the idea of a future cosmic cataclysm have not really read that chapter. They are proof texting. Let me make a few observations.

1. In verses 15-16, the Psalmist posits the fulfillment of his prophecy at the time of the redemption of Zion and the Day of the Lord:

“So the nations shall fear the name of the Lord, And all the kings of the earth Your glory. For the Lord shall build up Zion; He shall appear in His glory. He shall regard the prayer of the destitute, And shall not despise their prayer.”

This motif of the redemption of Zion is picked up in Hebrews 12:18f where the apostle says that Zion, is “heavenly” and it is “the church of the living God.” He also affirms that the coming Day of the Lord (for the redemption of Zion as foretold in Psalms) would be “in a very, very little while” and “will not delay” (10:37). Hebrews 12, picking up on chapter 1 and the prediction of the passing of heaven and earth, explains that it was the passing of the Old Covenant Zion- the Old Covenant creation, so that the everlasting kingdom would remain (v. 23-28).

2. This time of the redemption of Zion – the time of the passing of “heaven and earth”– is when God would create a New People!: (v. 18f-22):
“This will be written for the generation to come, That a people yet to be created may praise the Lord.
For He looked down from the height of His sanctuary; From heaven the Lord viewed the earth, To hear the groaning of the prisoner, To release those appointed to death, To declare the name of the Lord in Zion, And His praise in Jerusalem, When the peoples are gathered together, And the kingdoms, to serve the Lord.”

Now, unless futurists want to say that at the so-called “end of time” God will create another New People– necessitating the removal / negation / destruction of the body of Christ – then Psalms cannot be applied to any so-called end of time. The problem is that the only people to perish at the Day of the Lord, so that the Lord could create a New People, was Old Covenant Israel!

There is much, more that could be noted from Psalms 102, but this is more than sufficient to show that the Psalm is not concerned about the end of time. It is about the salvation of Israel at the Day of the Lord. That would be a glorious day, but also a horrific day. The bottom line is that it has nothing, absolutely nothing to do with the end of material creation.

3. Let me emphasize a critical point here: The promise of Psalms 102 is an Old Covenant promise made to Old Covenant Israel after the flesh. This logically means that it had to be fulfilled while Old Covenant Israel after the flesh existed (or exists) as God’s covenant people– while those covenant promises were still in effect.

It is axiomatic and undeniable that if a Law or covenant has been abrogated / annulled/ abolished, that none of its promises or penalties are valid and applicable. A dead law, a dead covenant, is, after all D-E-A-D. So, here is what that means.

The coming of the Lord of Psalms 102 is the coming of the Lord for the redemption of Zion, the salvation of Israel.

Paul said the coming of the Lord for the redemption / salvation of Israel would be in fulfillment of His Covenant with her (Romans 11:25-27)– “this is my covenant with her, when I take away her sin” (Romans 11:27).

Thus, God’s covenant with Israel would remain in effect until the coming of the Lord for the salvation of Israel.

This means that if Psalms 102 is not fulfilled, that Israel– Israel after the flesh– remains as God’s covenant people.

It is significant that in a FaceBook exchange with Frost, I asked him if Israel after the flesh was still God’s Covenant people. Frost’s vacillation and self-contradictory answers were astounding! He actually said that since God is the God of the living and not the dead, that this somehow proves that Israel after the flesh still exists!

The final point we will make from Psalms 102 is that David said the time of the passing of the heaven and earth would be at the Day of the Lord, when He would appear in Glory.

4. He shall appear in Glory– v. 15-16:
“So the nations shall fear the name of the Lord, And all the kings of the earth Your glory. For the Lord shall build up Zion; He shall appear in His glory.”

So, ask yourself, do we have any passages that speak of the coming of the Lord in glory? We have an abundance of them, actually:

“For the Son of Man will come in the glory of His Father with His angels, and then He will reward each according to his works. 28 “Assuredly, I say to you, there are some standing here who shall not taste death till they see the Son of Man coming in His kingdom.” (Matthew 16:27-28). The coming of the Lord “in the glory of the Father” the time of salvation, would be in the lifetime of Jesus’ audience.

“Immediately after the tribulation of those days the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light; the stars will fall from heaven, and the powers of the heavens will be shaken. 30 Then the sign of the Son of Man will appear in heaven, and then all the tribes of the earth will mourn, and they will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory.” (Matthew 24:30-31).

And when would this be? Jesus stated emphatically that it would be in his generation (v. 34). I can only observe ever so quickly that in verse 31, Jesus cites Isaiah 27:13, a resurrection prophecy which is about the time of Israel’s salvation (Isaiah 27:10f). So, like Psalms, Matthew 24 is about the time of Israel’s salvation, when the Lord would come in glory, and it would unequivocally be in Jesus’ generation! (Incidentally, but significantly, both Isaiah 27 and Matthew 24:29f posit that salvation of Israel / Zion at the time of the judgment of Israel for shedding innocent blood. Salvation and judgment were synchronous events).

Well, I have gone on longer than I intended to, but I hope that this (still brief) excursus on Psalms 102 demonstrates that it has nothing to do with the end of time. The reason I have spent this much time on this particular passage because in my formal debates, it is the passage most often appealed to.

Psalms 102 is about the eschatological salvation of Israel at the Day of the Lord, the destruction of the Old Covenant people, and the creation of the New Covenant people. We will establish that even further as we proceed. In the meantime, be sure to get a copy of my book, The Elements Shall Melt With Fervent Heat. In that book, I have even more in-depth analysis of Psalms and other OT prophecies that futurists often claim refers to a yet future passing of the physical cosmos.

Peter's passing of "heaven and earth" is not the passing of material creation!
2 Peter 3 has nothing to do with the end of time!

 
Stay tuned!

Blood Atonement and the Last Days – #5- Final Installment

Blood Atonement and the Last Days – #5– Final Installment

Be sure to read the previous installments:  #1   #2   #3   #4

Look now at how Revelation incorporates the key Old Testament prophecies of the Last Days and Blood Atonement that we’ve examined.

Deuteronomy 32:32, says that in Israel’s last days, she would become the vine of Sodom. In describing the city that killed the two witnesses, i.e., the prophets of God, she is spiritually called Sodom.

Likewise, at her destruction and demise, in Revelation 19, the paean of victory is sung and that victory is what? It is a direct echo of Deuteronomy 32: 43 that said He will avenge the blood of his saints. But in Revelation 19:2 we find, He has avenged the blood of his saints. Here is the Law of Blood Atonement fulfilled, as it was poured out on the city that had slain the prophets, Jesus and his apostles and prophets. They were unrepentant and hostile. There was no city of refuge for them.

Isaiah 2-4 predicted the last days vindication of the martyrs at the coming of the Lord. Yet, men would flee to the hills. Well, Revelation 6:12f, as we have seen, is a direct citation of Isaiah 2:19.

Isaiah 27 foretold the destruction of Leviathan at the time of the vindication of the martyrs. In Revelation 20:8f, we find the destruction of Satan at the end of the millennium.

Isaiah 59, the salvation of the remnant. Revelation 7 and 14, the salvation of the 144,000, the righteous remnant.

Daniel chapter 12 foretold the resurrection and the rewarding of the prophets. Revelation 11:15f, has the time of the dead that they should be judged, and the time to reward the prophets – once again a direct echo of Daniel 12. When would it be? At the fall of that city where the Lord was slain.

This raises another hermeneutical question. Each of these Old Testament prophecies posited martyr vindication – The doctrine of Blood Atonement – in Israel’s last days, at the end of the millennium and the destruction of Satan at the judgment of Old Covenant Israel. Revelation incorporates these Old Testament prophecies of the vindication of martyrs to promise imminent vindication at the judgment of Babylon. Revelation likewise incorporates Jesus’ promise of imminent vindication of the martyrs, the Old Testament prophets and Jesus’ apostles and prophets.

Remember Blaising’s quote that Revelation 20 is about the fulfillment of Jesus’ promises. If Revelation 20, the end of the millennium judgment, is about the fulfillment of Jesus’ promise of the vindication of the martyrs, then the end-of-the-millennium resurrection had to be in Jesus’ generation. All of these things would come upon this generation. Once again, Jesus undeniably posited vindication of the martyrs, all the blood shed on the earth, all the way back to creation, in AD70.

So a great hermeneutical question is raised: What is the justification for rejecting the Old Testament prophecies, Jesus’ emphatic promise, and Paul’s perfectly corresponding theology, and applying Revelation to a different persecuting power, a different set of martyrs, a different judgment, at the end of a different age, in fulfillment of a different set of promises, i.e., promises made to the church divorced from Israel? I suggest that there is no justification.

So I would ask you, and I would encourage you, yes, I would challenge you, to listen very carefully today. Listen very carefully to how the speakers who will follow — you know, well, I’ve got a target on my chest; I know I’m the first speaker, so here it is, you know, take a shot. But, listen very carefully to how the speakers deal with the undeniable fact that the consummative, not typological, but the consummative avenging of the martyrs is inextricably tied to Israel and her blood guilt in her last days, not the church divorced from Israel. Lamentably, far too few commentators honor this reality.

The Thessalonian Christians who were being persecuted by the Jews at that time would be given a relief “when the Lord Jesus is revealed,” and how they incorporate that with Jesus’ promise of vindication in that generation, thus delimiting the end of the millennium to that time.

I suggest that any interpretation of Revelation 20 that excludes Old Covenant Israel, her covenant promises and her blood guilt, thus her judgment, at the end of her covenant age, and ignores Jesus’ and Paul’s emphatic teaching on martyr vindication is prima facie false.

I think you can see that the vindication of the martyrs – and the application of the Law of Blood Atonement – is inextricably tied to the end of the millennium and to Israel, not the end of the church age.

Once again, Jesus emphatically posited vindication of all the martyrs, all the way back to creation, not just a small, isolated group, but all the martyrs all the way back to creation for his generation at the judgment of Jerusalem in AD70.

This agrees perfectly with all of the Old Testament prophecies, with what we have seen in Thessalonians and in Revelation. This definitively establishes my view. Does it raise all sorts of other questions? Indeed! But, all of the evidence points to the fact that the end-of-the-millennium resurrection was, “when the power of the holy people was completely shattered.” And no other time, and no other event better matches the Biblical datum than the end of the Old Covenant age of Israel that arrived with the destruction of Jerusalem in AD70.

Look now at how Revelation incorporates the key Old Testament prophecies that we’ve examined.

Deuteronomy 32:32, says that in Israel’s last days, she would become the vine of Sodom. In describing the city that killed the two witnesses, i.e., the prophets of God, she is spiritually called Sodom.

Likewise, at her destruction and demise, in Revelation 19, the paean of victory is sung and that victory is what? It is a direct echo of Deuteronomy 32: 43 that said He will avenge the blood of his saints. But in Revelation 19:2 we find, He has avenged the blood of his saints. Here is the Law of Blood Atonement fulfilled, as it was poured out on the city that had slain the prophets, Jesus and his apostles and prophets. They were unrepentant and hostile. There was no city of refuge for them.

Isaiah 2-4 predicted the last days vindication of the martyrs at the coming of the Lord. Yet, men would flee to the hills. Well, Revelation 6:12f, as we have seen, is a direct citation of Isaiah 2:19.

Isaiah 27 foretold the destruction of Leviathan at the time of the vindication of the martyrs. In Revelation 20:8f, we find the destruction of Satan at the end of the millennium.

Isaiah 59, the salvation of the remnant. Revelation 7 and 14, the salvation of the 144,000, the righteous remnant.

Daniel chapter 12 foretold the resurrection and the rewarding of the prophets. Revelation 11:15f, has the time of the dead that they should be judged, and the time to reward the prophets – once again a direct echo of Daniel 12. When would it be? At the fall of that city where the Lord was slain.

This raises another hermeneutical question. Each of these Old Testament prophecies posited martyr vindication in Israel’s last days, at the end of the millennium and the destruction of Satan at the judgment of Old Covenant Israel. Revelation incorporates these Old Testament prophecies of the vindication of martyrs to promise imminent vindication at the judgment of Babylon. Revelation likewise incorporates Jesus’ promise of imminent vindication of the martyrs, the Old Testament prophets and Jesus’ apostles and prophets.

Remember Blaising’s quote that Revelation 20 is about the fulfillment of Jesus’ promises. If Revelation 20, the end of the millennium judgment, is about the fulfillment of Jesus’ promise of the vindication of the martyrs, then the end-of-the-millennium resurrection had to be in Jesus’ generation. All of these things would come upon this generation. Once again, Jesus undeniably posited vindication of the martyrs, all the blood shed on the earth, all the way back to creation, in AD70.

So a great hermeneutical question is raised: What is the justification for rejecting the Old Testament prophecies, Jesus’ emphatic promise, and Paul’s perfectly corresponding theology, and applying Revelation to a different persecuting power, a different set of martyrs, a different judgment, at the end of a different age, in fulfillment of a different set of promises, i.e., promises made to the church divorced from Israel? I suggest that there is no justification.

So I would ask you, and I would encourage you, yes, I would challenge you, to listen very carefully today. Listen very carefully to how the speakers who will follow — you know, well, I’ve got a target on my chest; I know I’m the first speaker, so here it is, you know, take a shot. But, listen very carefully to how the speakers deal with the undeniable fact that the consummative, not typological, but the consummative avenging of the martyrs is inextricably tied to Israel and her blood guilt in her last days, not the church divorced from Israel. Lamentably, far too few commentators honor this reality.

The Thessalonian Christians who were being persecuted by the Jews at that time would be given a relief “when the Lord Jesus is revealed,” and how they incorporate that with Jesus’ promise of vindication in that generation, thus delimiting the end of the millennium to that time.

I suggest that any interpretation of Revelation 20 that excludes Old Covenant Israel, her covenant promises and her blood guilt, thus her judgment, at the end of her covenant age, and ignores Jesus’ and Paul’s emphatic teaching on martyr vindication is prima facie false.

I think you can see that the vindication of the martyrs – and the application of the Law of Blood Atonement – is inextricably tied to the end of the millennium and to Israel, not the end of the church age.

Once again, Jesus emphatically posited vindication of all the martyrs, all the way back to creation, not just a small, isolated group, but all the martyrs all the way back to creation for his generation at the judgment of Jerusalem in AD70.

This agrees perfectly with all of the Old Testament prophecies, with what we have seen in Thessalonians and in Revelation. This definitively establishes my view. Does it raise all sorts of other questions? Indeed! But, all of the evidence points to the fact that the end-of-the-millennium resurrection was, “when the power of the holy people was completely shattered.” And no other time, and no other event better matches the Biblical datum than the end of the Old Covenant age of Israel that arrived with the destruction of Jerusalem in AD70.

Be sure to get a copy of Sam Dawson’s excellent book, Revelation Revealed, for an in-depth study of the doctrine of Blood Atonement.

 

The Death of Jesus and the Chameleon Theology of Sam Frost

The Death of Jesus and the Death of Adam: The Chameleon Theology of Sam Frost

Sam Frost once espoused the truth of Covenant Eschatology. However, he abandoned that truth for some form of a futurist eschatology. Mr. Frost admits himself that his eschatology is still undergoing development and is not fully settled. And to anyone reading his blog comments and on FaceBook, that is abundantly– sadly and painfully, obvious. To understate the case, his constant vacillation, his blatant self contradictions and his grossly un-Biblical positions are embarrassing. But, he maintains that since he is (ostensibly at least) in step with the historical church and the creeds, that his is okay.

This article will expose the constantly changing nature of Frost’s theology in regard to the death of Jesus in the Bible. In 2012, Frost released his book explaining his “reasons” for abandoning the truth of Covenant Eschatology. In that book he offered his view of Adamic death, as three faceted:

Relational – Speaking of Christ and his work- including his death- he says: “He is cursed and estranged by the Law (Galatians 3:13).” (P. 58).

Sheolic – Frost says, “Adam entered sheol (when he died physically, DKP). Jesus entered sheol.”

Physical – Frost pulls a bit of sleight of hand here. He says: “Adam was cursed and estranged by breaking the command. Jesus physically died as a result.”

Do you see what he did there? Even though he had already admitted that Jesus was estranged from the Father as a result of bearing the sins of man, he did not want that to be too obvious, so, he once again affirmed that Adam was estranged but that Jesus died physically! He shifted gears in mid-stream from estrangement to physical death!

From these quotes it is undeniable that Frost was asserting that Adam died a three-fold death, and that Jesus entered fully into the death of Adam on the part of mankind. If Jesus did not fully enter all aspects of the death of Adam, then there is patently no way to argue that Jesus died to deliver man from Adamic Death.

Then, as he continued to struggle with the issue of Adam, death and the redemptive work of Jesus, Frost claimed: “ In reversal, the application of Jesus’ resurrection and redemption is applied to the believer: we do not enter sheol, the curse is removed for us in terms of estrangement, and we shall over come physical death as well in the resurrection. Death comes in these three forms: separation, physical death, sheol. Jesus conquered death completely.” (Samuel Frost, Why I Left Full Preterism, (Powder Springs, Ga; American Vision, 2012), 58).

So, per Frost, Christ has reversed two of the three aspects of the death of Adam. It is here that the chameleon theology / eschatology of Frost rears its revealing – self- defeating head.

In a recent FaceBook exchange, Frost said this about whether Jesus experienced alienation (i.e. estrangement) from the Father: “Sam does not believe, has never written in ALL of these exchanges that Jesus “died spiritually.” Notice that he says emphatically that he does not believe that Jesus “died spiritually.”

So, in giving his reasons for why he left the truth of preterism, he said it was because Jesus died the full orb of Adamic death. But, part of that “full orbed” death was estrangement and Jesus was “estranged.” He also experienced Sheolic Death. But, when debating Preston on FaceBook, he says he has never said, does not believe, that Jesus “died spiritually.” To say that this is self-contradictory is a huge understatement.

Then, Frost, even though he said Jesus never died spiritually, he says that Jesus went to Sheol. Well, isn’t Sheol alienation from God? If not, what is it? According to Frost it is fundamentally related to the curse of Adam and the “last enemy” in 1 Corinthians 15 – which is death. In Frost’s paradigm, physical death and Sheol are evil siamese twins that speak eloquently of the Curse of Adam. Sheol most assuredly is not indicative of salvation, Covenant relationship or dwelling in the Presence of the Lord in the MHP.

(In yet another FaceBook exchange, Frost’s views on Sheol and Heaven were exposed and revealed as self- contradictory as his views on the death of Jesus. I will not develop that here, except to say that Frost says that the saints now go to heaven when we die. But, of necessity, this demands that the resurrection has taken place, once again entrapping Frost in his new, not yet developed eschatology).

So, Frost has Jesus “estranged” and he has him going to Sheol, yet, he supposedly never died spiritually! This is double speak and nothing else.

Do not lose sight of the fact that according to Sam, Adamic death was spiritual, Sheolic and physical, with the physical being the exclusive focus of 1 Corinthians 15.

Interestingly, Frost almost down plays the covenantal / spiritual death of Eden. He also is forced to admit that Adam and Eve did not die “that day” as God promised. It took them 600 years to enter that death! So, Frost all but discounts his admission that they did die spiritually that day to focus on their death that did not occur that day, but centuries later!

See my article on Sam Frost and the Death of the Garden, in which I expose even more of Frost’s self contradictions. Among other things, Frost claimed that for Adam and Eve to understand what God meant when He threatened them with death, they had to have witnessed death already! This demands that if they understood what spiritual death was, they had to have witnessed it at work already! To say that this is un-Biblical is undeniable.

Since, per Frost’s latest claims, Jesus never experienced spiritual death – separation from God- then alienation from God cannot be the focus of the resurrection promise in 1 Corinthians 15. This ignores the fact that Paul specifically posits resurrection and forgiveness as inseparably inter-related, in v. 12-17). This also contradicts 1 Corinthians 15:55-56.

Paul anticipated the resurrection would be when “the law” that was the “strength of sin” would be overcome. Thus, resurrection from sin death. Not only that, but, it would be when sin, the “sting of death” would be overcome as well. Once again, resurrection at the triumph over sin death.

You must realize that per Frost, sin still brings spiritual alienation / estrangement! But, it not only still brings spiritual alienation / death, it still brings physical death! As a matter of fact, in one of the most confused and confusing bits of writing that you will find, Frost tries to answer the question of why Christians still die if Christ has dealt with sin. He poses the question:

“It may be asked here that if physical death is the punishment, or the result of sin (Adam’s sin) and Jesus has redeemed us from the curse, why do Christians still die? This is a fair question.” (2012, 59).

A fair question indeed!

Frost attempts to answer the question later by saying, “Being in this body means that we still have to undergo the effects of sin and death, even though the condemnation of sin is removed, which is the Gospel.” (P. 61).

Let me be very candid – this is absolutely awful theology! It makes the head spin it is so bad!

Catch the power of what Frost is saying.

1. Sin brings death (Romans 6:23); “The wages of sin is death.”

2. The Christian is forgiven of sin, and yet, although forgiven of sin (which is the ONE THING and THE ONLY THING that brings death as the curse of sin) the Christian is still under the effects (still under the curse!!) of sin and death! How is that for victory?

How is that for: “There is therefore, no condemnation for those who are in Christ, who do not walk after the flesh, but after the Spirit…for the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made us free from the law of sin and death.”

Notice that for those like Frost, they have to create a bifurcated “death” to explain Paul’s words here. The same is true for Jesus’ words in John 8:51, that those who keep his words will never die. Pretty clearly, all mankind, even the most faithful Christians, die physically. So, we are told that in those texts, the discussion is on spiritual death and not physical (although no proof of such a contrast is given or can be given).

But, if the law of sin and death in the Garden meant that the full orb of “death” was brought to bear through sin, then we have every right to ask: If the Christian is no longer subject to the law of sin and death, why is it that we have to die physically at all, since we are forgiven of that which brings death?

So, the child of God is not subject to the law of sin and death– per Paul the apostle. For Paul, “no condemnation” meant not being subject to the law of sin and death. However, according to Sam Frost, the Christian is still very much under the effects of sin and death! Well, if we are under the “effects” of sin and death, then we are subject to the law of sin and death, and if we are subject to the law of sin and death, then we are most assuredly – per Paul – under condemnation! Frost is in direct opposition to Paul.

Let me express it like this:

To be subject to the law of sin and death is to be under condemnation- Paul- Romans 8:1-4).

The Christian is under the law of sin and death- i.e. the Christian still lives in subjection to the effects of sin and death– Sam Frost.

Therefore, the Christian remains under the condemnation of sin and death.

Yet, per Mr. Frost- you really must catch the power of how disingenuous this really is – the Christian, living under the curse of sin and death, declares, by his death (the curse, penalty and condemnation of sin)– that he has triumphed over sin and death! Excuse me, but this is unmitigated nonsense! We declare and manifest victory by living under and suffering the Curse of sin?

How in the world can Frost say that: “We still have to undergo the effects of sin and death, even though the condemnation of sin is removed”? The condemnation of sin was death! The effect of sin was / is condemnation! If the condemnation of sin is removed, there is no “effects of sin” and there most assuredly should be no death! Do you see Mr. Frost’s problem here? This cannot be over-emphasized. It cannot be stated strongly enough.

Let me express it like this:

Prior to the coming of Christ, man lived under the effects of sin and death, experiencing physical death as the condemnation of sin.

After Christ’s resurrection, man– even those “in Christ” – lives under the effects of sin and death, experiencing physical death as the condemnation of sin.

And this is the victory?

Exactly how does it prove that we have the victory over sin and death when we continue to live under the curse (yes, the condemnation, of sin and death)? Sorry, but, as I sometimes say, “This does not even make good nonsense.”

Let me express Frost’s double speak like this:

The death of Adam included spiritual death- alienation from God – Frost.

Jesus never died spiritually, was never alienated from God – Frost.

Therefore, Jesus did not die the death of Adam (in its fulness).

I would strongly suggest that if Jesus did not die spiritually, was not alienated from the Father as a result of bearing the sins of man, then he did not die to deliver man from spiritual death.

But, Frost is easily defeated:

The death of Adam included spiritual death- alienation from God- Frost (videos #2-3; 2012, 58f).

Jesus died the full extent of Adamic Death– Frost.

Therefore, Jesus did die spiritually.

To put it another way:

Sheolic Death is estrangement from God.

Jesus died Sheolic Death– Frost.

Therefore, Jesus did die spiritually. (Jesus was estranged from the Father- Frost).

Frost is patently guilty of contradicting himself. Worse, he contradicts what the Bible has to say about the Adamic Curse, and, he is guilty of impugning the power of the blood of Christ.

Frost’s constantly shifting, constantly changing, “Chameleon theology” is a prime example of what I call “argumentum ad desperatum.” That is a “Latin” term that I personally coined (No, it is not a real Latin term) to describe the arguments of the enemies of Covenant Eschatology, when they realize that they cannot refute it by doing actual exegesis. In “desperation” they make up new and novel, self-contradictory and self-defeating “arguments” that turn and rend them.

Finally, consider the following: Frost constantly tells his readers that he holds to the creedal, traditional view of the historic church. Well, his vacillation on whether Jesus died spiritually raises an interesting question:

Did the historical church say that Jesus did die spiritually? If so, Frost (at least in some of his writings) denies this! So, he would be out of step with the traditional church’s view if this is the case.

Did the historical church say that Jesus did not die spiritually? If so, then Frost (in at least some of his writings) denies this! So, he would be out of step with the traditional church’s view if this is the case.

Thus, for Frost to claim, as he constantly does, that he holds to the consistent view of the creeds and the historical church is completely falsified by his vacillation on whether Jesus died spiritually. He both says he didn’t, but then he said he did! This is the Chameleon Theology of Sam Frost.

For an in-depth study of the death of Jesus in the Bible and his redemptive work to overcome the death of Adam, get a copy of my book, We Shall Meet Him In The Air, The Wedding of the King of kings. This book proves beyond successful disputation that the “Death of Adam” was not physical.

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Blood Atonement and the Last Days – #3

Blood Atonement and the Last Days – #3

Be sure to go back and read the first two installments in this series of articles on Blood Atonement. Number 1 hereNumber 2 Here.

The third text I want to look at is Isaiah, chapters 24-27, known as the Little Apocalypse. Beginning with verse 7 in chapter 25, the Lord said, “He will destroy on this mountain” – that’s Zion. I would like to have a lot to say about that, but I can’t – “the veil that is spread over all nations. He will swallow up death forever, and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all of the faces…and it will be said in that day, behold this is our God; we have waited for Him; He will save us…. We will be glad and rejoice in His salvation.” This is very clearly the end-of-the-millennium resurrection. It’s the very verse that Paul quotes in 1 Corinthians 15:55 when he said “this mortal has put on immortality… the corruptible has put on incorruption, then shall be brought to pass the saying, death is swallowed up in victory.” That’s Isaiah. Therefore, Isaiah is the end-of-the-millennium resurrection.

This is patently the salvation hope of Israel. But let’s look a little closer at the Little Apocalypse, let’s move into chapter 26. Now by the way, most of these men agree that the Little Apocalypse is speaking of the eschatological consummation, not a typological consummation. Isaiah predicted the end-of-the-millennium resurrection (Isaiah 25:8). Likewise chapter 26:19f, the earth shall give up its dead. But notice, it would be in the day in which the Lord shall descend out of the heavens and tread on the tops of the mountains (26:20).

But notice this. It is also the time of the vindication of the martyrs – the earth shall disclose its blood. Meredith Kline wrote a great article demonstrating this not too long ago. (Meredith G. Kline, “Death, Leviathan and Martyrs: Isaiah 24:1-27:1″ A Tribute to Gleason Archer, ed. by Walter C. Kaiser Jr. And Ronald Youngblood, Chicago; Moody Press, 1986), 229-249). But notice this. “In that day”; in what day? The day of the vindication of the martyrs, the day of the coming of the Lord, the day of the end-of-the-millennium resurrection. In that day, Leviathan shall be destroyed (27:1).

Note that in 27:10-11, it is at the time of the salvation of Israel which Isaiah 25:8-9 told us the resurrection is the salvation of Israel. Significantly, it is likewise, the time of the destruction of Old Covenant Israel, because in that day would be the time when He turns the stones of the altar into chalk stone, He destroys the fortified city, and, “the one who made them will no longer have mercy on them.” And why? Well, it tells us. Because, “this is a people of no understanding,” a direct citation or allusion to Deuteronomy 32:28. Deuteronomy 32:28 that said in Israel’s last days, here is what will happen: They will become like Sodom; I will destroy them. So, in Isaiah 24-27, we have Israel’s last days, the vindication of the martyrs at the destruction of Old Covenant Israel.

Passage number 4 – Isaiah 59. As universally acknowledged, Isaiah 27 and Isaiah 59 serve as Paul’s source for his prediction of the salvation hope of Israel in Romans 11:25-27. Just like Deuteronomy 32, just like Isaiah 2-4, just like Isaiah 26-27, Isaiah 59 predicted the vindication of the martyrs at the Day of the Lord and also at the judgment of Old Covenant Israel. Isaiah 59 breaks itself down easily into three headings:

Number one – Accusation – four times in verses 3-7 God accuses Israel of shedding innocent blood, of being quick to violence, and that leads to point #2.

Point #2 – Israel Acknowledges her guilt. Notice what she says, “our transgressions are multiplied before you.” This is Deuteronomy 31:29: You will fill up the measure of your sin. So Israel even admits her transgression, “our transgressions are multiplied before you.”

And so, Point #3 – Yahweh decides to take Action in verses 16f: “He put on the garments of vengeance for clothing, he was clad with zeal as a cloak, according to their deeds, accordingly he will repay, fury to his adversaries, recompense to his enemies…so shall they fear the name of the Lord…the redeemer will come to Zion and to those who turn from transgression in Jacob, says the Lord. As for me, says the Lord, this is my covenant with them.”

Now, Romans 11:25-27 anticipated the parousia for the salvation of Israel in fulfillment of Isaiah 27 and Isaiah 59; that is more abundantly clear.

However, Isaiah 27 and Isaiah 59 foretold the coming of the Lord, and to be sure, for the salvation of Israel, i.e., the salvation of the remnant. And, that would be at the end-of-the-millennium resurrection (Isaiah 25-26).

Remember it would be at the destruction of Leviathan, Satan. When does the destruction of Leviathan take place? All you have to do is read Revelation 20:10-12 – at the end of the millennium. When would that be, however? According to Isaiah 26:21 and Isaiah 59:16, it would be at the coming of the Lord for the vindication of the martyrs. But that is not all. It would be when the fortified city would be destroyed, the altar crushed and the people whom Yahweh had created would be forsaken. That is not the church.

Thus, Romans 11, being the anticipation of the fulfillment of Isaiah 27 and 59 would be fulfilled at the end of the millennium, at the avenging of the blood of the martyrs, at the time of the destruction of Old Covenant Israel. But, we want to look a little closer.

I suggest that there is no futurist eschatology that properly honors what Isaiah 27 and Isaiah 59 actually says.

Amillennialists redefine Israel in Romans 11, as somehow the church, or they posit the salvation of ethnic Jews throughout the entire span of the Christian age. Greg Beale does this. (Greg Beale, A New Testament Biblical Theology, (Grand Rapids; Baker, 2011), 706+). But these positions ignore the vindication of the martyr motif and the judgment of Israel motif explicitly found in Isaiah 27 and 59.

Post-millennialists likewise ignore the judgment of Israel and the martyr vindication (The law of Blood Atonement) specifically and explicitly found in Isaiah 27 and Isaiah 59, as does Kenneth Gentry. While Gentry spends time discussing Romans 11 in his massive He Shall Have Dominion, (Draper, VA, Apologetics Group, 2009)254) he ignores the prophetic background and does not so much as mention the themes found in Isaiah 27 / 59. He posits the traditional Postmillennial view that Romans 11:25f speaks of a yet future “massive, world-wide conversion.”

Pre-millennialists posit unbelieving Israel as the victim of a foreign persecuting power, not the persecutor as Isaiah clearly says. I would suggest, therefore, that none of these truly honors what Isaiah says. I have not found a single Dispensational author who honors the prophetic source of Romans 11:25f and the proper identification of Israel as the persecutor. Invariably, Premillennialists posit Romans 11 as predictive of a future time when Israel, being persecuted by the anti-christ, cries out to the Lord and is saved at the parousia.

This raises a very serious hermeneutical question. Isaiah 26 and 27 predicted the end-of-the-millennium resurrection, the Day of the Lord, the destruction of Satan, the vindication of the martyrs at the time of the salvation of the righteous remnant, as well as the judgment on Old Covenant Israel, not the church.

Isaiah 59 likewise foretold the Day of Lord, the vindication of martyrs, the salvation of the remnant, the judgment on Old Covenant Israel as the persecuting power. Now Romans 11 anticipated the fulfillment of Isaiah 27 and Isaiah 59. What then, is the hermeneutical principle for saying Romans 11 anticipates a future salvation of the church or deliverance of Israel from a foreign persecuting power divorced from the context of judgment on Old Covenant Israel for her blood guilt for shedding innocent blood? More on Blood Atonement and the Last Days in our next installment.

For an extensive discussion of the doctrine of Blood Atonement and its relationship to eschatology, see my book The Resurrection of Daniel 12:2: Future or Fulfilled?

Blood Atonement and the Resurrection are inter-related subjects!
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The Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 – #11- Holger Neubaur

the resurrectionThe Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 – Installment #11 by Holger Neubaur

We continue sharing with you the excellent thoughts from Holger Neubaur, on the resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15. Needless to say, most of Christianity claims that in this great chapter Paul was predicting an “end of time” resurrection of decomposed human corpses. But, Neubauer is showing with powerful exegetical proof, this is not what Paul is discussing in his teaching on the resurrection. Be sure to read the previous installments of this series, beginning here, and including the last installment.

We pick up Neubaur’s thoughts with verse 53f.

Paul again states, “for this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality (15:53).” Jesus promised, “he that liveth and believeth in me shall never die” (John 11:26). Again he said, “If a man keep my saying he shall never see death” (John 8:51). These were spiritual realities that Jesus was speaking about and Paul cannot be speaking of a different physical reality that some how trumps the importance of true spiritual life. Paul ties his entire discussion to the fact the death was being destroyed. He goes on to say, “so when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory” (15:54).

Paul now quotes from Isaiah 25:8, “He will swallow up death in victory; and wipe all tears from off all their faces.” This Old Testament prophecy must not be applied to a yet future generation for Jesus said, “one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law till all be fulfilled” (Matthew 5:18). The word “fulfilled” includes all prophecy because the word “fulfilled” inheres in prophecy. Jesus said, “this generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled”(Matthew 24:34). The same word “genetai” appears in both texts of scripture.

The death that is addressed is spiritual in nature and signifies the removal of fellowship with God. The Hadean world is the result of sin and resided outside the presence of God. Hosea 13:14 says, “I will ransom them from the power of the grave; I will redeem them from death: Oh death, I will be the plagues; Oh grave, I will be thy destruction; repentance shall be hid from mine eyes.” The corruptible body is the entire body that succumbed to death and decay. The body of Adam is the one where all die (1 Corinthian 15:22). Adam sinned and he died, just as is the case with all of mankind. Only in Christ is there true spiritual life, for Jesus said, “I am the life” (John 14:6). The mortality of Adam is overcome through the immortality of Christ, for He “only hath immortality” ( 1 Timothy 6:15). The death that is swallowed up in victory was the death lost in Adam; i.e, spiritual death, and was the consummation of the death that was being destroyed even as Paul penned these words, “who hath abolished death, and hath brought life and immortality through the gospel” ( 2 Timothy 1:10). Jesus’ promise that “he that liveth and beleiveth in me shall never die” (John 11:26) would now come to pass.

(It is this that then led to Paul’s exultant declaration of the victory of death to be found in 1 Corinthians 15.- DKP)

Be sure to order a copy of Don K. Preston’s book, We Shall Meet Him In The Air, the Wedding of the King of kings, for an in-depth study of the resurrection.

The Wedding of the King of Kings

The Resurrection of 1 Corihthians 15- #10

the resurrection
What is the resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15?

 

The Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 – #10- Holger Neubauer

We continue sharing thoughts on the resurrection and 1 Corinthians 15 from Holger Neubaur. Be sure to read the previous installment.
1 Corinthians 15:49, “And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall bear the image of the heavenly.” The church had borne the image of Old Covenant Judaism, but now it was to bear the image of the spiritual man in Christ. The perfect man would be presented after the miraculous age would end (Ephesians 4:13). The Corinthians were longing to seeing “face to face” that they would know about their true spiritual identity in Christ. They did not know while the miraculous age continued, for Paul argued, “for now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to face shall I know even as I am known ( 1 Corinthians 13:12). This comports with John’s statement, “Beloved, now are we the sons of God, it doth not yet what we shall be:but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him for we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is” (1 John 3:2). The final picture of the true spiritual man would be known at the revelation of Christ, and the spiritual gifts were promised until Christ’s return (1 Corinthians 1:6-8).
1 Corinthians 15:50, “Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption.” When Jesus came back in his physical body He was not in his glorified body as he challenged Thomas to thrust his finger in his side (John 20:27). In Luke’s account Jesus said, “Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I myself; for a spirit hath not flesh and bones” (Luke 24:39). Since “flesh and blood” will not inherit the spiritual nature of the kingdom, it is not a flesh and blood resurrection that Paul has in mind in here. The Old Covenant world that was inherited by “flesh and blood” is not how those would gain entrance into the spiritual kingdom of God, for Jesus taught that all men would have to be “born again” (John 3:3-5). Neither would a body that is “corruptible” or subject to death enter into the glorious kingdom of God. The early pilgrims were “begotten again to a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, To an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time” (1 Peter 1:4,5). The corruption that the early Christians escaped (2 Peter 1:4) was not physical but spiritual. This “already, but not yet,” that God would grant was not corruptible, but would be a body in which Jesus’ blood would clothe and change. The church which still had the remnants of Judaism in it was changing, but the change of how God viewed the church would come when God “would take away their sins” (Romans 11:25-27). Just as the High Priest granted the blessings of the covenant when he came out of the tabernacle to bless the people, so Jesus granted the forgiveness of sins as He came out of Heaven (Leviticus 9:20-22). This is the picture of Hebrews 9:24-27 as Jesus would appear a “second time without sin unto salvation.” This salvation was the topic of all the prophets as Peter instructed, “Receiving the end of your faith, even the salvation of your souls. Of which salvation the prophets have inquired diligently, who prophesied or the grace that should come unto you” (1 Peter 1:9,10). This is not Pentecost, for their salvation was still in their future and Isaiah prophesied that forgiveness would come “when he maketh all the stones of the altar as chalkstones” (Isaiah 27:9-13). This is a reference to the destruction of the temple.
The change that Paul promised was spiritual and not physical. This is the precise meaning of “Behold I show you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed” (1 Corinthians 15:51). The change was spiritual and from God’s perspective. The change was one of stance, not substance. The forgiveness of sins is the topic. The final pronouncement of Romans 11:25-27 is the topic. This would take place after the fullness of the Gentiles. The church which now was granted the full forgiveness which was promised before the foundation of the world would come to pass. Paul’s statement, “we shall not all sleep” was not a promise to some distant generation but to the one he was addressing. Paul promised that not all the Corinthians would die before they would experience this change. As Paul affirmed to the Thessalonians, “and I pray your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Thessalonians 5:23). Paul was not encouraging the Thessalonians to get a mortician to embalm their bodies so that they would be “preserved” for thousands of years, but rather praying that the Thessalonians would be alive to the coming of the Lord. All of this change would take place, “In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible , and we shall be changed” (1 Corinthians 15:52). The last trump is the seventh trump of the Revelation (10:7) as John announces the mystery of God is “finished” which corresponds to the trump that announced the “gathering” by Jesus and the end of the Jewish age (Mathew 24:30).

John and Jesus speak of one consistent end. The “end” that Jesus predicted almost forty years earlier was “at hand” when John wrote the Revelation (Revelation 1:3; 22:10). John prophesied that in the time of the seventh trumpet the “kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord” (Revelation 11:15). There is no plural number in the original. The kingdoms had now transitioned into the kingdom! This was so God could be “all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:28) as God would unite both Jew and Gentile into one kingdom and that there would be “one king” over all the earth (Zechariah 14:9). This was Paul’s mission as he made known “the fellowship of the mystery” (Ephesians 3:9). The Mishna taught that the feast of the trumpets was the birthday of the world, as the New Heavens and New Earth would announce the New Covenant world ruled by life rather than by death.

More on the resurrection coming up! And for more on the resurrection be sure to order Don K. Preston’s Seventy Weeks Are Determined…For the Resurrection.

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The book proves conclusively that the resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 was in AD 70!

The Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 – Article #9 by Holger Neubauer

the resurrection
What is the nature of the resurrection in 1 Corinthians 15?

The Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15- #9

1 Corinthians 15:44,45 identifies for us again the body under consideration, “It is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual body. And so it written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam was made a quickening spirit.” The natural body, represented in Adam was made a “living soul.” The natural body was the soul or spiritual body that died when it sinned. God said to Adam, “for in the day that thou eatest thereof, thou shalt surely die” (Genesis 2:17).

Adam did not die physically for 930 years (Genesis 5:3). The death that Adam died was spiritual in nature. As Paul affirmed, “so death passed on all men, for that all have sinned” (Romans 5:12). The last Adam was made a “quickening spirit.” Christ died in the spirit in order to be made alive in the Spirit. 2 Corinthians 5:14 says, “because thus we judge, that if one died for all, then were all dead.”

How were all dead at the time Paul wrote? Not physically, but spiritually, because all sinned as Adam had done. Therefore, Christ must have died spiritually in order to pay the price for sin. This again proves that Jesus died spiritually. See Don K. Preston’s book, We Shall Meet Him In The Air, The Wedding of the King of kings, for an extended discussion of Christ’s death and resurrection as it relates to the resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15.

The Wedding of the King of Kings
This book contains an in-depth study of the nature of the resurrection.

Jesus was made a “quickening spirit” because the spirit came alive. When Jesus said, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me” He was affirming the truth that He had died in spirit (Matthew 27:46). This is the only prayer that Jesus addressed to the Father that he used the title God. Jesus was giving up his relationship with His Father so that all of us could become sons.

1 Corinthians 15:46-47 speaks to the point of transitioning from the earthly to the heavenly, “Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is the Lord from heaven.” It was God’s plan to transition the earthly man to the spiritual man. Adam was a natural man as was the “natural man” of 1Corinthians 2:14. The “natural” unaided man could not discern the truth without the Spirit that provided the revelation to know the spiritual direction he should take, and the natural man which possessed his natural body could not find forgiveness without a spiritual body.

The second man is the “Lord from heaven” as the “body is of Christ” (Colossians 2:17). Paul continued, “and as is the heavenly, such are they that are heavenly ( 1 Corinthians 15:48).” The “they” refers to those who were becoming “heavenly” during the transition period as the church was stripping off its layers of Judaism (Acts 21:20; Hebrews 8:13). Paul would say, “And hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ” (Ephesians 2:6). This is another instance of the “already, but not yet of scripture.” Salvation and grace were things the church possessed in promise (Ephesians 2:8,9), but Salvation and grace were in their future as well (1 Peter 1:5,9,13). The same was true for the redemption of the body (Ephesians 4:30). The Ephesians were redeemed (Ephesians 1:7) but the Holy Spirit was the “earnest” or down payment “until the redemption for the purchased possession” (Ephesians 1:14).

The “purchased possession” is nothing other than the church which was purchased by the blood of Christ (Acts 20:28). The physical body does not need redemption because fingernails and toes were never lost. It is the spiritual body of which Christians were a part of that needed redemption. The whole “creation” which refers to those in Christ were anxiously awaiting for their redemption (Romans 8:23).

More to come on the resurrection, so stay tuned!

The Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 – Article #8- Holger Neubauer

the resurrectionThe Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 –

Be sure to read the previous installment in this series on the resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15.

1 Corinthians 15:39-41 points out the difference between fleshly bodies and heavenly bodies. There is a “flesh of men” and of “beasts.” These earthly animals have earthly bodies. There are bodies that are “celestial” (heavenly) and bodies “terrestrial”(earthly). The resurrection is more like the (heavenly) celestial than the (earthly) terrestrial. Paul points to heavenly bodies of the sun, moon and stars. Daniel 12, which speaks of resurrection contains parallel thoughts. Daniel 12:3 says, “And they that shall be wise shall shine as the firmament.” Jesus quoted from this passage when speaking about the “end of the age” (Matthew 13:39), when He said, “then the righteous shall shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of God (Matthew 13:43).” Both the dead in Christ that were transported out of Hades and presented before God, and the living that would experience the resurrection would shine to varying degrees are the subject. Jesus said, “So let your light so shine before men” (Matthew 5:16), as Paul affirmed, “among whom ye shine as lights in the world; Holding forth the word of life” (Philippians 2:15). To varying degrees, subjects of the eternal life are the ones that allow the gospel to shine forth in the darkness of the unsaved. This fits 1 Corinthians 15:42, “So also is the resurrection of the dead.”

1 Corinthians 15:42 b finishes the thought, “It is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power.” The Old Covenant body, which was transitioning, was sown in weakness. It was weak because it could not save. The false teachers of Peter’s day who denied the coming of Christ and argued, “all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation” (2 Peter 3:3) promised “liberty but were servants of corruption” (2 Peter 2:19). The natural body was corruptible because when it sinned it died. Paul affirmed, “when the commandment came, sin revived and I died” (Romans 7:9).

In 1 Corinthians 15:43, Paul does not change subject, “It is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power:” The body was raised in power because sin was destroyed in the new body. Paul affirms the blessing for those exclusively in Christ, “For in Adam, all men die, so in Christ shall all be made alive” (1 Corinthians 15:22). The transitional body of suffering and humiliation was constantly being transformed so that it might be “fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue all things to himself” (Philippians 3:16). This is a picture of the church, not a picture of flesh and blood as the futurist avers. Paul said, “hath put all thing under his feet and gave him to be the head over all things to the church” (Ephesians 1:23). The spiritual domain in which Christ was to rule, was already in progress. This again, is the “already, but not yet” of scripture. The verb “raised” (egeiretai) is a present tense and indicative mood verb which tells us the action of the verb was taking place at the time Paul wrote. Literally, they were being raised in power.

The Resurrection of 1 Corinthians 15 – #7 by Holger Neubauer

the resurrection
Does the physical resurrection of Jesus demand that the resurrection of believers is physical?

The Resurrection – More on the Nature of the Resurrection #7 By Holger Neubauer

1 Corinthians 15:35-50 speaks of the nature of the resurrection and the body that was to be raised. Some at Corinth asked, “how are the dead raised up? And with what body do they come” (15:35). The question revolved around the Jews being raised and the nature of their resurrection. If the body of Christ would be raised, how then would the Jews be raised? The singular “body” and the plural “they” point to a corporate resurrection of a singular kind. The argument centered around “their body” as opposed to “our body.” This implies that the Corinthians understood the corporate nature of the resurrection, that it belonged to the body of Christ. Isaiah’s words remind us that it was God’s intention to raise Old Covenant Israel, “Thy dead men shall live together with my dead body shall they arise. Awake and sing, ye that dwell in the dust” (Isaiah 26:19). Paul begins to argue the case for the type of body in which Old Covenant saints would be raised.

The Resurrection Demands “Death”

The first point Paul makes is that before a body is raised it has to die. This is so obvious that Paul states the truth in the most forceful way, “Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die” (1 Corinthians 15:36).

Paul’s next point is that the body that they were presently sowing was not the body that “shall be.” The body that the Corinthians were sowing was not yet seen, just as a grain of seed, “may chance of wheat, or of some other grain” (1 Corinthians 15:37). The seed was still so small, it could not be discerned as to what the final outcome would produce. Paul said earlier, “For now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known” (1 Corinthians 13:12). This spiritual face to face meeting would come at the end of the revelation and end of the law. 1 John 3:2 echoes the same teaching, “Beloved, now we are the sons of God, and it doth not appear what we shall be: but we know that when he shall appear, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.” John is not emphasizing a physical transformation but a spiritual one. The vestiges of the law were still apparent to the early church as the elders of Jerusalem informed to Paul, “many of thousands of Jews there are which believe and they are all zealous of the law”(Acts 21:20). The law, with its new moons and sabbaths, Paul said, “are a shadow of things to come” (Colossians 2:17). The law was a shadow of the church which in its true and complete spiritual sense was still to come. Paul used the word (ARE) “eimi” which has no past tense in the Greek. The law still possessed its shadows, even as Paul wrote, that would be taken away at the revelation of Christ. Hebrews 8:13 taught the same truth, “a new covenant, he hath made the first old, that which decayeth and waxeth old is ready to vanish away.” The perfect man and the unity of the faith were just around the corner (Ephesians 4:11-13).
1 Corinthians 15:38 posits the truth, “But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body.” This seed is the “seed of the kingdom” which was bringing forth the spiritual kingdom of God. Jesus affirmed the consummation of the kingdom would come with the fall of Jerusalem (Luke 21:31) as John affirmed as well (Revelation 11:15;12:10). The kingdom would be completed when the revelation of the New Covenant would be completed. 1 Corinthians 13:10 and “that which is perfect” is a reference to the completion of the kingdom which coincided with the completion of revelation (1 Corinthians 1:6-8). The seed of the kingdom would bring out the perfect body of Christ, as the transitioning New Covenant from the Old Covenant would bring about the body of Christ. The law, which contained shadows of things to come, but the “body is of Christ” referred not to heaven but to the heavenly church (Colossians 2:17).

More to come in this excellent series on the Resurrection  by Holger Neubauer, so stay tuned!

Zechariah 14- Responding to the Critics

Responding to the Critics on Zechariah 14

Among dispensationalists Zechariah 14 is considered a major problem for the preterist paradigm. “Zechariah 14 states that when Christ returns, His feet will touch the Mount of Olives and the Mount will split. Since this has not happened, Christ could not have returned in AD 70.”

Unfortunately for the Dispensational world, Zechariah actually supports preterism and falsified millennialism.

Let me make a few observations.

First, the objection is presuppositional. It assumes that Zechariah 14 must be interpreted literally, and refuses to allow for Hebraic metaphoric language. More on that below.

Second, and significantly, it ignores the New Testament commentary on Zechariah.

Third, it ignores the rest of the Biblical testimony about the nature of Christ’s coming.

Let me flesh out these points as we continue Responding to the Critics.

Zechariah predicted the coming of the Lord and the splitting of the mountains and the objection demands a literalistic fulfillment. The objection fails to consider that God had come out of heaven in the past, and the mountains had split at His coming!
Notice Micah 1:3f
“For behold, the LORD is coming out of His place; He will come down And tread on the high places of the earth. The mountains will melt under Him, And the valleys will split Like wax before the fire, Like waters poured down a steep place. All this is for the transgression of Jacob And for the sins of the house of Israel. What is the transgression of Jacob? Is it not Samaria? And what are the high places of Judah? Are they not Jerusalem? Therefore I will make Samaria a heap of ruins in the field, Places for planting a vineyard; I will pour down her stones into the valley, And I will uncover her foundations. All her carved images shall be beaten to pieces, And all her pay as a harlot shall be burned with the fire; All her idols I will lay desolate, For she gathered it from the pay of a harlot, And they shall return to the pay of a harlot.”

Note the following:
☛ God was coming down out of heaven.
☛ He was going to walk on the mountains.
☛ The mountains would melt under him, the valleys would split (sound familiar?).
☛ Samaria would be destroyed, turned into a heap.
☛ This coming would be as a direct result of Israel’s sin, her violation of Torah: “All this is for the transgression of Jacob And for the sins of the house of Israel.”
☛This destruction was the invasion of the 10 northern tribes of Israel, in the eighth century BC, at the hands of Assyria.

If a person denies that this was a historical Day of the Lord, a non-literal, non-physical, non-bodily coming of YHVH, (i.e. a time of the manifestation of God’s sovereignty by His use of the Assyrians), and if they claim that it is the same “end of the age” coming of the Lord as in Zechariah, then here is what this demands.

It demands that the coming of the Lord in Zechariah must be at the time of the destruction of Samaria.
It demands that the coming of the Lord in Zechariah must occur at a time when the Law of Moses would still be in effect. Remember, the coming of the Lord in Micah is specifically stated to be coming on Israel for her sin.

I know of no Dispensationalists who teach that Israel will one day be destroyed in the manner described in Micah, for the reasons given by Micah. Further, all Dispensationalists admit that Torah has been nullified in the first century. It should be noted that Zechariah 14 would also be fulfilled “in the day” in which YHVH terminated His covenant with both houses of Israel (Zechariah 11:9-11).

What this demands therefore, is that we honor the reality of metaphoric language in Micah. And if Micah used the language of the coming of the Lord out of heaven and the mountains splitting, the valleys being destroyed, etc. then this raises the distinct possibility that Zechariah is likewise utilizing a genre of prophetic language that was not intended to be taken literally.

Responding to the Critics: Zechariah 14 and the Law of Moses

The context of Zechariah 14 is undeniably that of the destruction of Jerusalem. Look at verses 1-5:
“Behold, the day of the LORD is coming, And your spoil will be divided in your midst. For I will gather all the nations to battle against Jerusalem; The city shall be taken, The houses rifled, And the women ravished. Half of the city shall go into captivity, But the remnant of the people shall not be cut off from the city. Then the LORD will go forth And fight against those nations, As He fights in the day of battle. And in that day His feet will stand on the Mount of Olives, Which faces Jerusalem on the east. And the Mount of Olives shall be split in two, From east to west, Making a very large valley; Half of the mountain shall move toward the north And half of it toward the south. Then you shall flee through My mountain valley, For the mountain valley shall reach to Azal. Yes, you shall flee As you fled from the earthquake In the days of Uzziah king of Judah. Thus the LORD my God will come, And all the saints with You.”

No matter what else a person might say about the text, it clearly predicted a coming judgment of Jerusalem at the Day of the Lord. (See my discussion of Zechariah in the book of Revelation in my Who Is This Babylon book).

So, the context of Zechariah 14 is, without question, the destruction of Jerusalem. The question of course is, which destruction? Millennialists claim that Jerusalem is attacked during the so-called seven year tribulation, after the rapture. But, this will not work.(See my book Leaving the Rapture Behind for a refutation of the rapture doctrine). We will continue our study of Zechariah 14 as continue our efforts of “Responding to the Critics” – in part two.